30 1 / 2014

Here’s a thing that very few will tell you about, and might come as a big surprise;

you will feel lonely.

Not depressingly so. But you’ll feel quite small and insignificant the first week or two in your new place.

So make sure that you meet a lot of friends during that time. Invite some friends over to see your new place. Invite your mum over for coffee. I don’t know what you prefer, but just make sure to socialise, or you might find yourself getting a tad bit depressed.

My brother was convinced that he would take to it like a fish to water when he moved out, and instead he became severely depressed. Mostly due to the fact that he just didn’t socialize those first few weeks, and later on he just didn’t feel up to it.

I met friends every day after my move in, and despite a few lonely moments, moving away from home didn’t feel all that different.

So what is it then that makes you feel lonely?

Well, obviously, it’s a new place. New territory, new smells, new sounds and new people.

But, besides your new surroundings, there’s also the fact that it’s just you now.

In that little home, there’s just you.

And it might just sound cozy and perfect, but those first few nights when you’re curled around your pillow, it just feels strange.

Kind of like that first night at camp out of town.

Keeping socialized it vitaly important, because you’ll quickly realize that nothing has really changed.

Yes, you’ve moved away from home. it’s now you who handle the cooking, the grocery shopping and cleaning, and you have no set time when you have to be home at night.

But nothing has really changed. Your friends are still there, your family is still there and you still have to go to work to bring the dough in at the end of the month.

Not socializing will make you feel alienated, and you might just end up depressed or a tad bit more anti-social than before.

And remember, if you do feel lonely; tell someone!

It’s nothing to be ashamed of; it’s completely normal.

You don’t have to feel like you’re whining about it.

Just…I don’t know.

When someone asks you how it is at your new place, just casually say that ‘it’s brilliant, but it gets a bit lonely at times. Would you like to have a movie-night or whatever sometimes?’

30 1 / 2014

If you’ve never done your own laundry before, it’s about time you learned.

Invest in some good, environment-friendly soap, stay away from fabric-softeners ( apparently, they can cause eczemas and allergies and what not) and one or two of those laundry bags for your bras ( unless you’re a guy. Then you can skip that last part).

Now, if you’ve never been taught how to do your own laundry, nor have anyone to teach you, there are several guidelines on the internet.

The basic things you need to know is basically

-how many degrees can I wash my laundry in?

-can I tumble dry this item?

and

-will it leave stains when wet?

Also, seperate your dirty laundry in darks, white and coloured. Be aware that new items can stain other items in and after the first wash, so make sure to read any tabs or stickers on your new clothes before you throw these ‘little annoying pieces of papers’ out.

Make sure to invest in a laundry-basket that has handles and is easy to carry.

Yes, I know, it doesn’t look as fancy as that other one, but it will be a LOT easier later on.

Now, I presume it’s not the same in every apartment complex, but in mine, we have 2 washers/dryers and a drying-room. We can only book a 4-hour time each day (8-12, 12-4 and 4-8) and we can leave our clothes for up to an hour in the drying room after our time is over.

Now, here’s the most important advice I’ll be able to give you;

-DON’T LEAVE YOUR CLOTHES UNATTENDED!

Even if it says that you can; DON’T.

There’s always someone who’ll either walk in to do their laundry or book a time, catch sight of your drying laundry, and suddenly you’re 3 jeans poorer.

My brother recently had a very expensive shirt of his stolen, and he was NOT a happy camper.

So instead of just throwing your laundry into the washer, or abandoning your clothes for an hour so that they can dry properly, see your time in the laundry-room as your time to get things done. Bring homework, your phone, a book or whatever. Think you’ll get hungry? Bring a snack. Don’t leave anyone alone with your laundry.

When all your washing is done- clean up after yourself.

This will be extremely appreciated by other tenants, which will make things easier for you in the long run.

Doing your own laundry will not only make you feel a bit more grown up, but also make you more aware of what kind of clothes you spend your money on.

You’ll definitely develop a habit of checking washing labels, and shy away from anything to requires a lot of gentle care.

29 1 / 2014

If you’ve never lived in an apartment before, it will be a pretty big change in your life.
I know it was for me. Coming from a well off family, the closest thing I have ever come to an apartment before was either when visiting a friend from school, or staying in that hotel in Manhattan that one time.

Unless you’re incredibly rich, or had the great luck to move into a newly built apartment, chances are that you will get to know your neighbours incredibly well within the first week - without ever meeting them. I had the luck to snatch a low-rent apartment in a old, pretty building in the middle of town.

I considered myself pretty lucky until last night ( or early morning), when my upstairs neighbours decided to have a bit of…loving moment.
So if the mere thought of hearing strangers engage in sexual activity makes you break out in hives, I’d think twice before signing any contract.

Also - things will not be perfect. Chances are that you won’t have a top-notch stove or a nice shower with good water-pressure. I was lucky enough to get that ( and I feel kind of spoiled for it) but with it I also got a giant grease stain on the wallpaper and quite an amount of holes in the hallway wall. I haven’t quite figured out what to do with the hallway yet, but my headboard managed to hide the grease stain at least…barely.

Also, you’ll have to be considerate of your neighbours. Yes, I know that staying up all hours of the night, having friends over all the time and playing grungy music until 4am sounds wonderful. But the people in the apartments around you might have to go up to work the next morning. In the small apartment-complex I live, you can’t play loud music ( or have a party) between 11pm-5am. These six hours of the night/morning, you can do whatever you want. Quietly.

You don’t want to get on the bad side of your new neighbours. Even if they all seem like a young, hip and relatively relaxed bunch of people, many of them will get pissed off if they have to work the next day, and get woken up by your TV at 3am.
Play nice, and they might let it slide once or twice.
Be inconsiderate and they’ll pounce at the opportunity to report you to the landlord and have you kicked out.

29 1 / 2014

First brilliant idea; skip the boxes. Instead, pull out every bag you own. Suitcases work splendidly in a situation like this, and can be used repeatedly. Best part, you don’t have to worry about them breaking, leaving you standing in the middle of the street with your knickers and what not flying in the wind. Get the ones with wheels! Then you won’t have to worry about hurting your back. Don’t have any suitcases? Borrow from friends and family. And when you’ve unpacked it all, you can simply return them, or ( as I did the first week) simply stack them atop of each other, throw a blanket over them, and use them as a nightstand.
This has been a giant money-saver for me, as one simple box can cost 3dollars here in Sweden. Unless you buy them used of course. Yeah, I think suitcases were a good idea.

First brilliant idea; skip the boxes. Instead, pull out every bag you own. Suitcases work splendidly in a situation like this, and can be used repeatedly. Best part, you don’t have to worry about them breaking, leaving you standing in the middle of the street with your knickers and what not flying in the wind. Get the ones with wheels! Then you won’t have to worry about hurting your back. Don’t have any suitcases? Borrow from friends and family. And when you’ve unpacked it all, you can simply return them, or ( as I did the first week) simply stack them atop of each other, throw a blanket over them, and use them as a nightstand.

This has been a giant money-saver for me, as one simple box can cost 3dollars here in Sweden. Unless you buy them used of course. Yeah, I think suitcases were a good idea.

(via marci1900)